HCA 699 When reviewing the literature and different types of evidence, there are often gaps in the findings

HCA 699 When reviewing the literature and different types of evidence, there are often gaps in the findings

HCA 699 When reviewing the literature and different types of evidence, there are often gaps in the findings

When reviewing the literature and different types of evidence, there are often gaps in the findings. Are such gaps a help or a hindrance when wanting to create a change?

Re: Topic 6 DQ 1

Research for evidence-based practice is key in gathering information on a certain topic or in healthcare, a disease, prevention or intervention. The amount of data is immense, and finding the right data that is both qualitative and quantitative can be time consuming and daunting. Facilitating change in a clinical setting can be risky if there are gaps in the evidence. The criticality will vary depending on the situation and the evidence. Gaps in information can mean different things.

Gaps in knowledge can be helpful from the perspective of creating an opportunity for clinicians to reach out to others in the field to collaborate on the research to develop and compare how to disseminate the information into a working strategy. Gaps provide a means for leveraging the existing evidence and designing and evaluating newer clinical interventions to build on the current knowledge (Rahman, A., Applebaum, R., Schnelle, J. & Simmons, S. 2012).

Systematic reviews provide information to researchers that is both known and unknown, and as a result makes it difficult for researchers to efficiently gather gaps and research recommendations. This is a hindrance because of the time it takes to disseminate the information into a useful viable treatment. In situations where the gaps in the information is great, clinicians may need to make decisions with the information that is available, which may prove to be a hindrance on the overall benefit of the intervention, and therefore making it difficult to apply or change a policy or process (BMJ, 2015).

References:

BMJ Group blogs. (n.d.). Retrieved May 10, 2020, from https://blogs.bmj.com/ce/2015/04/09/addressing-gaps-in-evidence/

Rahman, A. N., Applebaum, R. A., Schnelle, J. F., & Simmons, S. F. (2012). Translating Research into Practice in Nursing Homes: Can We Close the Gap? The Gerontologist, 52(5), 597-606. doi:10.1093/geront/gnr157

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RESPOND

Response

The project sought to address the growing concern of falls among the adult inpatients in the surgical unit through effective nursing rounds and call lights. Essentially, the episodes of fall cause adverse consequences in patients such as high mortalities, longer hospital stays, premature re-admissions, and longer pain and high likelihood of disabilities(Milatet al., 2011). Therefore, resolution of falls among adult inpatient in the surgical unit will lead to numerous positive changes such as ensuring patient safety from dire fall-related effects. Moreover, resolving the patient falls is also critical in safeguarding nurses and ensuring their workplace welfare in various ways such as enabling them the opportunity for optimal practice since the patients will record minimal effects of the incidences of fall(King et al., 2018). Besides, resolving the issue of falls will lessen the nursing workload and related stress attributed to pain a patient suffers from falls, which will eventually help nurses to avoid burnout and increase work morale.

References

King, B., Pecanac, K., Krupp, A., Liebzeit, D., & Mahoney, J. (2018). Impact of fall prevention on nurses and care of fall risk patients. The Gerontologist58(2), 331-340. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1093/geront/gnw156

Milat, A. J., Watson, W. L., Monger, C., Barr, M., Giffin, M., & Reid, M. (2011). Prevalence, circumstances and consequences of falls among community-dwelling older people: results of the 2009 NSW Falls Prevention Baseline Survey. New South Wales public health bulletin, 22(4), 43-48.

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